Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Corned Beef & Cabbage

MediLodge of Plymouth would like to wish everyone a safe and happy St Patrick’s Day with this wonderful recipe.

Corned beef and cabbage is a favorite Irish recipe that many people make and enjoy during their St. Patty’s Day festivities. Simple and easy, since it can made in a crock pot in the morning and it’s ready for dinnertime. For a heartier and more colorful meal , add potatoes and carrots to the recipe.
Ingredients:
• 1 (3 to 4 pound) corned beef brisket
• 1 onion, halvedcorned beef
• 2 ribs celery with tops
• 1 carrot, peeled
• 2 bay leaves
• 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
• 2 cloves garlic
• 4 to 6 new potatoes, peeled and quartered
• 4 to 6 carrots, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
• 1 medium head cabbage, cut into wedges
Preparation:
Cover meat with cold water and add onion, celery, 1 carrot, bay leaves, pepper and garlic. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer about 3 hours or until meat is tender. When a fork can pierce the meat easily, it is done. Leave in broth for an additional hour. Remove meat from broth. Boil potatoes, remaining carrots and cabbage in corned beef broth until tender, about 10 minutes. When vegetables are done, serve on plate with several slices corned beef on top of vegetables.

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

 

 

 

Celery, the Boring Yet Underestimated Vegetable

By Chris Burchell, MediLodge of Monroe Executive Chef

Well, this is a winter for the annals! We are near breaking the record for most snow recorded in one winter and we still have a month and a half to go. Oh Spring, where are you??? I suppose there is no good in lamenting over things beyond our control. March is National Celery Month. Celery is a vegetable often perceived as, well, boring! I mean it has to be boring, if it is the favorite staple for those wishing to shed a few pounds doesn’t it? Well my friends, while it may be a somewhat boring vegetable, celery has been important to us humans for quite some time.celery

Celery is believed to be originally from the Mediterranean basin. Ancient literature documents that celery, or a similar plant form, was cultivated for medicinal purposes before 850 B.C. During ancient times physicians used celery seed to treat the following conditions: colds, flu, water retention, poor digestion, various types of arthritis, and liver and spleen ailments. The Italians domesticated celery as a vegetable in the 17th century resulting in selections with solid stems.

There are two types of stalk celery varieties, self-blanching or yellow, and green or Pascal celery. In North America green stalk celery is preferred and mainly eaten raw although it is also eaten cooked. Celeriac, grown for its large bulb (commonly but incorrectly called celery root), is very popular in Europe where it is eaten cooked or raw. Currently California harvests about 23,500 acres per year, Florida 3,500 acres per year, and Michigan 3,000 acres per year. I absolutely love celeriac! Its flavor is made to be partnered with roasted meats, so I’m including a recipe I hope you’ll use with your next pot roast or leg of lamb.

Mashed Celeriac

Ingredients:

• 1 celeriac, peeled

• 1/4 cup olive oil

• 1 handful fresh thyme, leaves picked

• 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

• sea salt

• freshly ground black pepper

• 1/4 cup vegetable or beef stock

Instructions:

1. Slice about ½ inch off the bottom of your celeriac and roll it on to that flat edge.

2. Slice and dice it all up into 1/2 inch cubes. Don’t get your ruler out – they don’t have to be perfect.

3. Put a casserole-type pot on a high heat, add olive oil, then add the celeriac, thyme and garlic, with a little seasoning.

4. Stir around to coat and fry quite fast, browning a little, for 5 minutes.

5. Turn the heat down to a simmer, add the water or stock, place a lid on top and cook for around 25 minutes, until tender.

6. Season carefully to taste and stir around with a spoon to smash up the celeriac.

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

March is National Nutrition Month

MediLodge of Howell celebrates National Nutrition Month and encourages you to incorporate healthier food in to your diet. Nutrition involves monitoring the food and drink that is necessary for living. Nutrition is important for living a healthy lifestyle. By practicing proper nutrition, you can have a healthy body and long life. There are some things you should know about nutrition and the information in this article can help you with a few tips to show you just how easy it is to incorporate good nutrition into your life.

We eat vegetables both cooked and raw. Which is better? Raw vegetables have their advocates. But current studies show that most vegetables have higher nutritional value and are more digestible when cooked. Carrots and cabbage are tasty eaten raw, but many vegetables are palatable only when cooked. Steaming is the best method to retain food value.

March is National Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month

Seniors can live longer, stay sharp mentally longer and maintain a high quality of life longer, with good nutrition every day. Brightly colored fruits and vegetables help keep bones stronger, which reduces the risk of fractures. The nutrients in fruits and vegetables can also reduce recuperation times in the event a fracture occurs.

Introduce food to your young children gradually. If they are small, expect them to want to touch and smell the food first. Don’t chide then for doing this, or they may have a negative impression of the food and refuse to eat it. Help them to get a grasp on the color, texture, and smell of the food.

As stated earlier, nutrition includes monitoring the food and drink that is necessary for living. Nutrition keeps people healthy and proper nutrition is essential for a long life. Using the information in this article, you can practice proper nutrition and live a long and healthy life.

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Howell

MediLodge of Howell

Super Bowl Sunday Stew

Your party guests and football fans are sure to enjoy this hearty stew!  This recipe comes to you from MediLodge of Rochester Hills.

SUPER BOWL SUNDAY STEW

stew21 pound beef (1-inch cubes)

Salt and pepper

3 tablespoons butter

30 ounces canned tomato juice

30 ounces canned diced tomatoes,

5 celery stalks, chopped small

2 carrots, peeled (cut in rounds or quarters)

2 onions, peeled and sliced thin

3 cloves garlic, pressed

1 potato, peeled and cubed

1 (10 oz) package frozen okra

3 to 4 tablespoons barley

3 cubes beef bouillon

10 ounces frozen corn

3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons salt (optional)

6 to 8 stalks parsley, finely chopped

Water, as needed

1 pinch cayenne (optional)

12 black peppercorns

2 bay leaves

1/2 teaspoon thyme

Sauté meat pieces in butter over medium high heat until browned on all sides, about 5 minutes.

Pour into a 5- or 6-quart slow cooker or crock pot, add remaining ingredients, and mix well to blend. Note: You can add water to this stew depending on the thickness you want (about 4 cups for a thick stew). Cover and cook on LOW for 6 to 8 hours. Stir occasionally during the day. Taste for seasoning just before serving. If you want a bite to this stew, you can add to taste some cayenne. Serve in heated bowls with some country peasant bread or bread of your choice, in big chunks and with lots of butter.

Yields 6 servings.

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Rochester Hills

MediLodge of Rochester Hills

Happy New Year Cookies!

New Year Wishes!
To the many wonderful lodgers and very helpful staff I have met, thank you for making me feel so welcome. I look forward to being a part of a Zensational Journey at MediLodge of Milford.

Happy New YearI wish you health…
So you may enjoy each day in comfort.
I wish you the love of friends and
family and peace within your heart.
I wish you the beauty of nature…
That you may enjoy the work of God.
I wish you wisdom to
choose priorities…
I wish you happiness and joy…
and blessings for the New Year.
I wish you the best of everything…
That you so well deserve.
Happy New Year, Friends!
Roxanne Pappas, Leisure Coordinator at MediLodge of Milford

In honor of National Oatmeal Month, try this zesty twist to oatmeal cookies!
orange oatmeal cookiesOrange Oatmeal Cookies
Ingredients:
1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter
1 egg
1/4 cup mashed ripe banana (about 1/2 banana)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons orange zest
1 cup whole-wheat flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup golden raisins (or 1/2 cup chocolate chips)
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350°F. In bowl, cream butter and egg together until well blended and smooth. Gradually beat in banana, vanilla and brown sugar. Add orange zest. Mix well with wooden spoon until all ingredients are blended. In large bowl, mix flour, salt, baking powder, oats or 4-grain cereal, coconut, walnuts and raisins or chocolate chips. Use wooden spoon to combine dry ingredients until they are blended well and evenly distributed. Stir dry ingredients into wet ingredients and mix thoroughly until there is no sign of dryness. Very lightly butter baking sheet, drop heaping tablespoon of dough onto greased sheet 2 inches apart, and press down lightly against dough to flatten. Bake 20 minutes in preheated oven until lightly browned. Cool on wire rack. Makes 16 large cookies.

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Milford

MediLodge of Milford

January is National Egg Month!

By Chris Burchell, MediLodge of Monroe Executive Chef

I hope everyone had happy holidays and enjoyed all the loved ones in their lives. Man, time is flying, and 2014 is upon us. Well, January is National Egg Month. The egg…nowhere in the culinary arts is an item/ingredient so prevalently used and in so many different types of applications. The egg, as a “universal” food product for humans around the globe, probably predates any other food product known with the exception of salt; but then I personally would throw salt into the “seasoning” category as opposed to “food product.”

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Generally the chicken egg, but also eggs of various other fowl, is the most commonly eaten egg. But let’s not forget that amphibians, reptiles, and fish all lay eggs. Almost all of these animal’s eggs have been consumed by some peoples of the world at some time or another. Eggs have been known to, and enjoyed by, humans for many centuries. Jungle fowl were domesticated in India by 3200 B.C.E. Record from China and Egypt show that fowl were domesticated and laying eggs for human consumption around 1400 B.C.E., and there is archaeological evidence for egg consumption dating back to the Neolithic age. The Romans found egg-laying hens in England, Gaul, and among the Germans. The first domesticated fowl reached North America with the second voyage of Columbus in 1493.

Eggs can be eaten by themselves as their own, whether by frying, boiling, or poaching. Eggs can be a binding agent in cooking, or a leavening agent in baking. They can be whipped to further increase volume. The whites and the yolk can be handled independently and in completely different ways in the same dish. The egg has such a large culinary impact that the “toque” or chef ’s hat, which is pleated, is supposed to have as many pleats as the number of ways the chef wearing said item can prepare eggs.

I am going to give directions for making the perfect hard boiled egg as well as the perfect soft boiled egg as my experience has shown that most people have difficulties with egg preparation.

*Additional tip: Older eggs used for hard boiling peel easier due to a change in the pH level of the egg. If you can, buy eggs needed to be hardboiled well in advance (3 weeks) before needing them. If you cannot do this, then add 1 Tbsp. Baking Soda to every quart of cooking water.

eggsHard Boiled Egg

Directions:

1. Place eggs in pot. Add cold tap water until eggs are completely covered. Place pot on burner on high heat.

2. As soon as the water comes to boil, remove pot from the heat source, cover and start a 13 minute timer.

3. Meanwhile get a bowl, which is sized to hold double the amount of eggs being boiled. Fill bowl halfway with ice. When the timer ends, remove eggs from hot water and place into ice in bowl.

4. Add enough cold tap water to completely cover eggs, stir around to disperse heat from eggs. As soon as the egg doesn’t feel warm it is ready to be peeled or put into the refrigerator.

 

Soft Boiled Eggcup

Directions:

1. 1. Fill a saucepan about halfway with water and bring it to a boil.

2. 2. Decrease the temperature so that the water reduces to a rapid simmer and gently lower the eggs into the water one at a time.

3. 3. Cook the eggs for 5-7 minutes: 5 minutes for a yolk that is still runny and 7 minutes for a yolk that is barely set.

4. 4. Drain the eggs and run them under cold tap water for 30-60 seconds.

5. 5. To eat, use a knife or egg-cutter to take the cap off the tip of the egg and eat it straight from the shell, preferably with plenty of toast for dipping. More firmly-cooked eggs can be cracked (carefully!) and peeled like a hard boiled egg. All soft-boiled eggs should be cooked to order and eaten immediately.

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

January is National Oatmeal Month

The Most Powerful Breakfast for Weight Loss from MediLodge of St Clair

Did you know that simply eating breakfast raises your metabolism by 10 percent? Oatmeal is one of the most powerful breakfast foods of them all. If you are looking to get your body in great shape, you should incorporate this as a staple food in your diet.oatmeal

Oatmeal is the perfect meal to start your day because it boosts your energy and has plenty of fiber to keep you full and satisfied. Oatmeal breaks down slowly in the stomach, giving you long-lasting energy. It is also full of water-soluble fibers, which play a crucial role in making you feel full over a longer period of time. Studies have also shown that oatmeal reduces cholesterol, maintains blood sugar levels and fights against heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity.

If you want to add some powerful antioxidants to your oatmeal, simply throw on some blueberries and raspberries. These delicious fruits are packed with antioxidants that fight against heart disease, cancer, and a multitude of other ailments. Blueberries have also been proven to preserve vision. This powerful fruit rated highest in antioxidants among over 40 fruits and vegetables. What more could you ask out of the first meal of your day?

However, oatmeal doesn’t just have to be for breakfast. You can use it a couple hours before you exercise to energize your workout. You can even include oatmeal in your smoothies. It is also a wonderful addition to muffins and even as a covering for chicken breasts. Keep in mind that you must buy the unsweetened, unflavored variety. To spice it up a little, you can use bananas, berries, or milk. The downfall of pre-flavored oatmeal is that it often comes loaded with sugar calories. So, stick to the good stuff.

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of St Clair

MediLodge of St Clair

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