Archive for the ‘MediLodge of Taylor’ Category

On-Site Swallow Studies are Now Available at the MediLodge of Taylor

taylor swallow studiesSwallowing disorders, which may also be called dysphagia (dis-FAY-juh), can affect adults at very different stages in the swallowing process. Some signs of difficulty may include coughing or choking during or after eating/ drinking, a wet-sounding voice, weight loss or dehydration, chest congestion or pneumonia, or foods getting stuck in the mouth. These can all result in malnutrition and/or dehydration, an increased risk of food or liquid entering the airway (called aspiration which can lead to pneumonia), and a reduction in the enjoyment of a meal or sharing a meal with others.

A speech-language pathologist (SLP) is able to diagnose swallowing disorders, and may use a modified barium swallow study to further assess swallowing function in patients who are experiencing dysphagia. A modified barium swallow study involves an x-ray of a patient while they eat and/or drink items containing barium. The barium allows the SLP to determine the presence/risk of aspiration, assess what parts of the swallowing process are not working correctly, and make recommendations for foods/drinks that are safest to swallow as well as techniques to help a patient improve their swallowing function to safely participate in eating/drinking.

Traditionally, a patient would have to be scheduled for an appointment at a hospital or facility that performs modified barium swallow studies, resulting in the need for transportation and time away from the patient’s home environment. The Medilodge of Taylor is now offering on-site modified barium swallow studies in our own facility. This allows for reduced time for the patient in the study, no need for transportation to an unfamiliar environment, and faster results allowing for quicker turnaround for valuable patient care.

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Taylor

The New Wellness Center at MediLodge of Taylor

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Giving Back to the Community

The MediLodge Whole Person Wellness theme of giving back continued into the early weeks of December at MediLodge of Taylor.

Taylor Senior Center Singers

Taylor Senior Center Singers

We partnered with the Taylor Senior Center and Retired Senior Volunteer Program, who were doing a pencil drive for the kids of the Taylor School System. When the delivery was made, their count was 580 pencils and our donation doubled that. They were extremely thankful and pleased with our willingness to participate.

animals

Friends of the Taylor Animal Shelter

The Taylor Animal Shelter was another delivery we made. With the cold months coming up and all the dogs in need, we decided they would be another group that we would focus on. We were able to get two boxes of blankets, several bags of dog, cat, puppy and kitten food. Don’t forget the little bag of toys that was delivered as well! They need to have some play time while in their cages. The workers reminded me that their shelter is open M-F from 8-4:30 if anyone is looking to adopt a pet in the upcoming months.

Our donations didn’t just come from our staff members here, our residents families got involved in the giving of items as well. I would like to put out a huge “Thank You” to everyone that participated in helping brighten the days of these animals and children.

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor employees distribute food and clothing.

On November 24th, 2013 the staff cooked a huge Holiday meal and delivered it in person to the 144 bed shelter for Veterans in Detroit. The food was donated by Sam’s Club, and prepared by MediLodge staff in our facility kitchen. This Wellness theme continues to be a very popular event and we are now carrying it over into December with a family of five adopted children that we will be providing a special Christmas for. The staff here at MediLodge of Taylor have the biggest hearts imaginable and I am proud to work with these special employees.
Carol Armstrong RN-BC
Director of Nursing, MediLodge of Taylor

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor

Making and Keeping Your Resolutions

It’s time for that annual ritual of making (and breaking) our New Year’s resolutions. There is something about the idea of being able to start over that motivates us to pause (at least briefly) and reflect on our lives as they are, as well as how we would like them to be. Yet how many times have you thought back to last year’s goals and found that many or most of them were abandoned or just forgotten after a few weeks or months into the year? MediLodge of Taylor offers the following tips to help put you on the right course and assist you in staying committed to your most important goals for 2014.

woman at computerStart with a life vision If you don’t know what you want your future to look like, how can you decide what areas of your life need to be worked on? Spend some quiet time TODAY reflecting on (and writing down) what is good, bad or incomplete. Then try to see your life if all of these areas were addressed and had become satisfactory to you.
Get organized Clear away clutter. Go through paperwork, files, old bills and receipts, closets, drawers and storage containers. Decide what you need and will use and either throw out or give away all the rest. Put aside some time each week for this purpose. Keep ONE calendar to record all appointments, events, etc. Write down everything- don’t rely on memory.
Expand your horizons/commit to learning something new Challenging yourself will infuse you with greater energy and sense of purpose. It will help build your self-esteem to realize you really are capable of more than you had previously believed. This new learning can also give you additional resources to assist you in your career or personal life.
Write down your resolutions Write them down and stick them on your bathroom mirror, your fridge, your car dashboard, your desk or wherever you know will be a good place for you to see them. You can also show them to a good friend, family member, your coach or anyone who could provide support and encouragement.
Take care of yourself; eat well. Exercise regularly and learn to control and eliminate unhealthy stress eat wellThis is an obvious one, so why is it often ignored or overlooked when we are attempting to make important life changes? How many times have you said, I don’t have the time to eat right, exercise, sleep adequately, etc? Not caring for yourself will guarantee failure. So, why not make this your first and most important resolution for 2014?
Work to eliminate bad habits Including this as a New Year’s resolution would put you on the road to good follow-through. Bad habits will sabotage your efforts and use up your time, energy and focus. For each bad habit you decide to eliminate, have a good habit in mind to replace it with.
Set appropriate and healthy limits in all areas of your life Knowing your limits and enforcing them with yourself and others is a prerequisite to a healthy life and relationship. Learn to say no and enough and be firm in your resolve that this is a good thing to do. Otherwise, you will also be undermining your resolution to take care of yourself.

Now begin this year with the resolve to be the person you know you have the potential to be. You’ll be pleased with the wonderful changes that await you!

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Taylor

The New Wellness Center at MediLodge of Taylor

Physical Therapy & Fall Prevention

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor Physical Therapy

by Ebony Rice, DPT, MediLodge of Taylor

Falls and fall-related injuries, such as fractures, are a growing problem among older adults, often causing longstanding pain, functional impairments, reduced quality of life and mortality. Falls are one of the leading causes of accidental death among people older than 65 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year one in every three adults age 65 and older falls. Among the elderly, most falls occur indoors during usual activities of daily living such as transfers into or out of bed and walking. Age related factors contributing to falls include but are not limited to: changes in postural control; changes in gait; and declining visual abilities.

With increasing age, muscle tone, strength, and proprioception (our internal sense of body position) are all decreased which may cause slower righting reactions. Ambulation is slower and older adults demonstrate a lower swing height which leads to catching of the toe or tripping. Visual conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and health related vision changes; all contribute to declines in depth perception, clarity, visual field, dark adaptation and color sensitivity which increases the risk of falling over unseen objects. Fall prevention is a multidimensional process. Physical therapy aides in the prevention of falls by assessing falls risk and addressing the impairments related to advanced aging. Physical therapists design and implement individualized regimens that include strengthening, gait and balance activities.

Exercises that focus on strengthening core/postural muscles along with those needed for ambulation (hip, knee and ankle muscles) can increase stability when performing functional mobility. Gait training with or without assistive devices is also a major component of physical therapy. Therapists may assess and recommend assistive devices, such as canes and walkers, which may be beneficial for older adults at high risk for falls. If not used properly, assistive devices can become a fall hazard. Choosing the appropriate assistive device, the appropriate height and gait training which focuses on safety and sequencing are all aspects of skilled therapy that should be performed by a physical therapist. The use of an assistive device will allow for the highest level of independence while increasing safety.

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor Physical Therapy

Standing dynamic balance activities, such as throwing and catching a ball, facilitates balance reactions which are needed to correct yourself when loss of balance occurs. Physical therapy also implements balance activities that simulate functional activities performed daily, for example, reaching up into a cabinet.

Therapists educate patients and caregivers on ways to adapt or compensate for a deficit in the visual field. For example, a person who recently had a stroke may neglect the visual field on one side. Physical therapy focuses on training that individual to turn the head to increase the visual field and ensure safety when walking and/or performing functional mobility.

Physical therapists educate and instruct patients on fall recovery; the safest and most effective way of getting up after a fall occurs. Physical therapists also perform home evaluations to assess the possible hazards and adaptations needed to increase safety in the home while performing activities of daily living.

Falls are often unreported due to fear of losing ones independence. Repeated falls can be a sign of a change in medical status. There are many health conditions that may contribute to falls: stroke, heart attacks, diabetes, brain injuries, etc. Additionally, some medications that treat certain health conditions have possible side effects that may increase the chance of fall occurrence. Falls can be a sign of a more serious problem and should always be reported to a medical doctor. While physical therapy does not prevent falls, physical therapy may improve the impairments related to falls which in turn, decreases the risk of falls.

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge Explains The Difference Between Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy?

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor

Physical therapy and occupational therapy are two important fields in the rehabilitation of patients here at MediLodge of Taylor. While they often work together and share equal importance, there are differences between the two.

The occupational therapist is trained to modify the physical environment as well as train the person to use assistive equipment to increase independence. They focus to help their patients engage in meaningful activities of daily living. The physical therapist is trained to identify and maximize quality of life and movement potential within the spheres of promotion, prevention, diagnosis, treatment/intervention, and rehabilitation. They focus on the physical, psychological, emotional, and social well-being.

As an example: an occupational therapist is often involved in educating people on how to prevent and avoid injuries, as well as educating people about the healing process. Physical therapists in turn often help people improve their ability to do their daily activities through education and training. While there is this crossover between professions both play very important roles and are more specialized in their areas of expertise. In many situations, both types of health-care professional are involved in injury recovery.

Physical and occupational therapy is a booming field in the healthcare industry. Both professions require special certification and a post-bachelor’s degree to practice. According to the U.S. Bureau of  Labor Statistics, the number of Occupational Therapists in the work force is expected to increase by 26 percent between 2008 and 2018, and the number of Physical Therapists is expected to increase by 30 percent. As you can see, the fields of physical and occupational therapy are growing areas that are very important in patient care.

For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Taylor

MediLodge of Taylor

Healthy Lifestyle Tips from MediLodge of Taylor

by Kathleen Kadau, RD, MediLodge of Taylor

Eating right doesn’t have to be complicated.  The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has healthy eating tips focusing on older adults.  It is part of their campaign promoting informed food choices and developing positive eating and physical activity habits.  Dedicate yourself to a healthy lifestyle in 2013 with these tips.

Taylor Healthy Tips

• Make half your plate fruits and vegetables

Eat a variety of vegetables, especially dark-green, red and orange vegetables plus beans and peas.  Fresh, frozen and canned vegetables all count.  Choose “reduced sodium” or “no-salt-added” canned vegetables.  Buy fruits that are dried, frozen or canned in water or 100% juice, as well as fresh fruits.

• Make at least half your grains whole

Choose 100% whole-grain breads, cereals, crackers, pasta and brown rice.  Look for fiber- rich cereals to help stay regular.

• Switch to fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt and cheese

Older adults need more calcium and vitamin D to help keep bones healthy.  Include three servings of fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt or cheese each day.  If you are lactose intolerant, try lactose-free milk or a calcium-fortified soy beverage.

• Vary your protein choices

Eat a variety of foods from the protein food group each week, such as seafood, nuts, and beans and peas, as well as fish, lean meat, poultry and eggs.

• Cut back on sodium and empty calories from solid fats and added sugars

Look out for salt (sodium) in foods you buy.  Compare sodium in foods and choose those with lower numbers.  Add spices or herbs to season food without adding salt.  Make major sources of saturated fats such as desserts, pizza, cheese, sausages and hot dogs occasional choices, not every day foods.  Switch from solid fats to oils when preparing food.  Drink water instead of sugary drinks.  Select fruit for dessert.  Eat sugary desserts less often.

• Enjoy your food but eat less

Most older adults need fewer calories than in younger years.  Avoid oversized portions.  Try using a smaller plate, bowl and glass.  Cook more often at home, where you are in control of what’s in your food.  When eating out, choose lower calorie menu options.  Choose dishes that include vegetables, fruits and whole grains.  When portions are large, share a meal or take half home for later.  Write down what you eat to keep track of how much you eat.

• Be physically active your way

Pick activities that you like and start by doing what you can.  Every bit adds up and health benefits increase as you spend more time being active.  If you are currently inactive, start with a few minutes of activity such as walking.  Gradually increase the minutes as you become stronger.

Just seven simple steps to bring you closer to looking and feeling your best.

Good Luck!

 

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Physical Therapy Exercises for Balance at MediLodge of Taylor

As physical and occupational therapists, we understand that good balance is the foundation for all movement activities as well as functional activities.  In the physical and occupational therapy departments here at MediLodge of Taylor, we strive to maximize a person’s quality of life by focusing on several categories, including strength, posture, mobility, gait and function.  Having good balance is the foundation for each one of these categories.

Taylor Balance

By performing balance exercises, you help to strengthen the appropriate muscles in your lower legs that are needed for movement activities.  Having an aligned center balance point helps the individual to have an upright posture, which reduces friction on the joints, thereby decreasing pain in the joints and surrounding muscles.  Balance training is the key to having good posture.  Equilibrium exercises also help to enhance mobility.  By having a good balanced base of support, the extremities are able to produce force and complete the tasks efficiently.  Furthermore, having to balance is critical for gait.  When we walk, we spend time balancing on one foot during the stance phase of walking.  Consequently, practicing balance exercises for standing on one foot is essential for maintaining stability while walking.

 

Balance training is essential to perform before starting a stretching program.  Stability exercises will help you stay grounded while you reach out to touch your toes or reach back behind you to stretch the back.  Many stretching positions can put you in a position of being off balance.  That is why it is essential to practice equilibrium routines before you start to stretch.

Monroe OT

Finally, having good stability is critical for all functional movements including our activities of daily living.  We all need balance skills for reaching overhead into a cupboard without falling backwards. Additionally, moving from sitting to standing requires stability so that we do not fall forwards when we get up.  Going up and down stairs also requires balance abilities to maintain proper momentum and to keep from tripping and falling.  As physical and occupational therapists, we know that good balance is a foundation required to perform all these movements.

 

In physical and occupational therapy, we apply balance activities to most of the exercises that we have our patients perform.  For example, to increase balance skills, or to build strength and core muscles as well as help those sore shoulder muscles heal, we can add standing on a soft or uneven surface while performing shoulder strengthening exercises.  To help build muscle strength that supports arthritic knees, we often train the hamstring and quadriceps muscles to perform strengthening exercises while on a balance board.  The added challenge of imbalance enhances strength and balance abilities at the same time.  Additionally, in therapy we make sure to challenge our postoperative hip and knee replacement folks with their balance during walking.  We often add obstacles like stepping over cones or on and off different size steps to advance coordination, proprioception and stability.

Montrose Therapy Success small 2012

Who says physical therapy can’t be fun?

April is Occupational Therapy Month.  We would like to acknowledge our Occupational Therapists and recognize the differences they make in our Lodger’s lives:  Julia Gile, Lynaire Days, Mala Sabnas, Stacy Schubert-Winters and Christine Plonka.  THANK YOU!

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