Archive for the ‘Nutrition’ Category

Celery, the Boring Yet Underestimated Vegetable

By Chris Burchell, MediLodge of Monroe Executive Chef

Well, this is a winter for the annals! We are near breaking the record for most snow recorded in one winter and we still have a month and a half to go. Oh Spring, where are you??? I suppose there is no good in lamenting over things beyond our control. March is National Celery Month. Celery is a vegetable often perceived as, well, boring! I mean it has to be boring, if it is the favorite staple for those wishing to shed a few pounds doesn’t it? Well my friends, while it may be a somewhat boring vegetable, celery has been important to us humans for quite some time.celery

Celery is believed to be originally from the Mediterranean basin. Ancient literature documents that celery, or a similar plant form, was cultivated for medicinal purposes before 850 B.C. During ancient times physicians used celery seed to treat the following conditions: colds, flu, water retention, poor digestion, various types of arthritis, and liver and spleen ailments. The Italians domesticated celery as a vegetable in the 17th century resulting in selections with solid stems.

There are two types of stalk celery varieties, self-blanching or yellow, and green or Pascal celery. In North America green stalk celery is preferred and mainly eaten raw although it is also eaten cooked. Celeriac, grown for its large bulb (commonly but incorrectly called celery root), is very popular in Europe where it is eaten cooked or raw. Currently California harvests about 23,500 acres per year, Florida 3,500 acres per year, and Michigan 3,000 acres per year. I absolutely love celeriac! Its flavor is made to be partnered with roasted meats, so I’m including a recipe I hope you’ll use with your next pot roast or leg of lamb.

Mashed Celeriac

Ingredients:

• 1 celeriac, peeled

• 1/4 cup olive oil

• 1 handful fresh thyme, leaves picked

• 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

• sea salt

• freshly ground black pepper

• 1/4 cup vegetable or beef stock

Instructions:

1. Slice about ½ inch off the bottom of your celeriac and roll it on to that flat edge.

2. Slice and dice it all up into 1/2 inch cubes. Don’t get your ruler out – they don’t have to be perfect.

3. Put a casserole-type pot on a high heat, add olive oil, then add the celeriac, thyme and garlic, with a little seasoning.

4. Stir around to coat and fry quite fast, browning a little, for 5 minutes.

5. Turn the heat down to a simmer, add the water or stock, place a lid on top and cook for around 25 minutes, until tender.

6. Season carefully to taste and stir around with a spoon to smash up the celeriac.

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

March is National Nutrition Month

MediLodge of Howell celebrates National Nutrition Month and encourages you to incorporate healthier food in to your diet. Nutrition involves monitoring the food and drink that is necessary for living. Nutrition is important for living a healthy lifestyle. By practicing proper nutrition, you can have a healthy body and long life. There are some things you should know about nutrition and the information in this article can help you with a few tips to show you just how easy it is to incorporate good nutrition into your life.

We eat vegetables both cooked and raw. Which is better? Raw vegetables have their advocates. But current studies show that most vegetables have higher nutritional value and are more digestible when cooked. Carrots and cabbage are tasty eaten raw, but many vegetables are palatable only when cooked. Steaming is the best method to retain food value.

March is National Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month

Seniors can live longer, stay sharp mentally longer and maintain a high quality of life longer, with good nutrition every day. Brightly colored fruits and vegetables help keep bones stronger, which reduces the risk of fractures. The nutrients in fruits and vegetables can also reduce recuperation times in the event a fracture occurs.

Introduce food to your young children gradually. If they are small, expect them to want to touch and smell the food first. Don’t chide then for doing this, or they may have a negative impression of the food and refuse to eat it. Help them to get a grasp on the color, texture, and smell of the food.

As stated earlier, nutrition includes monitoring the food and drink that is necessary for living. Nutrition keeps people healthy and proper nutrition is essential for a long life. Using the information in this article, you can practice proper nutrition and live a long and healthy life.

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Howell

MediLodge of Howell

Heart Healthy Practices

By Chris Burchell, Executive Chef at MediLodge of Monroe

So who’s tired of shoveling snow?? And the winter has just begun … at least as far as the calendar is concerned. I, however, am not convinced. As far as I am concerned, we are neck deep in winter. And while shoveling snow can be some good exercise, I for one am nearly over it. We are now about to be smack dab into February, a month notably attributed to Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s Day, a day associated with hearts, seems to be very appropriate for February, given the fact that February is also National Heart Healthy Month! Ah our heart … this great engine of our cardiovascular system unfortunately goes unnoticed until something terrible happens. This is why recognizing heart healthy practices are so important. Along with a bit of exercise, the easiest way to take care of our heart is by being diligent in choosing the right things to eat.

Heart-healthy is not only about oatmeal and omega-3 fats, whole grains, beans and legumes, nuts, and teas are just as important, in that they offer all sorts of complex heart-protective phytonutrients. Fresh produce provides the cornerstone for a heart-healthy diet because they help wipe out free radicals in the bloodstream, protecting blood vessels. Salmon tops the list of heart healthy foods, but many foods are really quite good and are not exotic at all. Almonds & walnuts, kidney beans, red wine, brown rice, carrots, broccoli, spinach, and blueberries are all very effective at nutritionally providing things the heart loves.

The main idea would be to eat “whole-foods”… foods that are not processed at all, or at least minimally processed. Eating these kinds of food every day will greatly help you to have a healthier heart. And with a greater number of different items, you allow yourself to not become bored, which is the death blow to any “healthy” change in lifestyle.

Maple Glazed Salmon Salad

Ingredients
Walnut Oil Vinaigrette:
• 1/2 cup walnut oil
• 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
• 2 tbsp Dijon mustard
• 1 garlic clove, mincedSalmon
• ½ tsp salt
• ¼ tsp pepper
Salad:
• 1 tbsp olive oil
• 2 tbsp real maple syrup
• 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
• 1 lb salmon filet
• Salt and pepper
• 6 cups baby spinach
• 1 cup Blueberries
• 1 cup walnuts, lightly toasted
Instructions:
1. For Walnut Oil Vinaigrette, whisk all ingredients together and set aside.
2. For the salad, preheat oven to 4250F and brush a baking dish with olive oil.
3. In a small bowl, whisk together Dijon mustard, maple syrup and maple extract.
4. Cut filet into 4 even portions and arrange in baking dish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and brush with glaze.
5. Bake 9 to 11 minutes, until fish is cooked through and flakes easily with a fork. Remove and let cool 10 minutes.
6. Divide baby spinach between 4 large plates.
7. Sprinkle each with chopped blueberries and walnuts.
8. Top each with a salmon portion.
9. Enjoy with a glass of red wine…my favorite – Valpolicella, a fruity but not sweet red.

Recipe provided by alldayidreamaboutfood.com

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

Making and Keeping Your Resolutions

It’s time for that annual ritual of making (and breaking) our New Year’s resolutions. There is something about the idea of being able to start over that motivates us to pause (at least briefly) and reflect on our lives as they are, as well as how we would like them to be. Yet how many times have you thought back to last year’s goals and found that many or most of them were abandoned or just forgotten after a few weeks or months into the year? MediLodge of Taylor offers the following tips to help put you on the right course and assist you in staying committed to your most important goals for 2014.

woman at computerStart with a life vision If you don’t know what you want your future to look like, how can you decide what areas of your life need to be worked on? Spend some quiet time TODAY reflecting on (and writing down) what is good, bad or incomplete. Then try to see your life if all of these areas were addressed and had become satisfactory to you.
Get organized Clear away clutter. Go through paperwork, files, old bills and receipts, closets, drawers and storage containers. Decide what you need and will use and either throw out or give away all the rest. Put aside some time each week for this purpose. Keep ONE calendar to record all appointments, events, etc. Write down everything- don’t rely on memory.
Expand your horizons/commit to learning something new Challenging yourself will infuse you with greater energy and sense of purpose. It will help build your self-esteem to realize you really are capable of more than you had previously believed. This new learning can also give you additional resources to assist you in your career or personal life.
Write down your resolutions Write them down and stick them on your bathroom mirror, your fridge, your car dashboard, your desk or wherever you know will be a good place for you to see them. You can also show them to a good friend, family member, your coach or anyone who could provide support and encouragement.
Take care of yourself; eat well. Exercise regularly and learn to control and eliminate unhealthy stress eat wellThis is an obvious one, so why is it often ignored or overlooked when we are attempting to make important life changes? How many times have you said, I don’t have the time to eat right, exercise, sleep adequately, etc? Not caring for yourself will guarantee failure. So, why not make this your first and most important resolution for 2014?
Work to eliminate bad habits Including this as a New Year’s resolution would put you on the road to good follow-through. Bad habits will sabotage your efforts and use up your time, energy and focus. For each bad habit you decide to eliminate, have a good habit in mind to replace it with.
Set appropriate and healthy limits in all areas of your life Knowing your limits and enforcing them with yourself and others is a prerequisite to a healthy life and relationship. Learn to say no and enough and be firm in your resolve that this is a good thing to do. Otherwise, you will also be undermining your resolution to take care of yourself.

Now begin this year with the resolve to be the person you know you have the potential to be. You’ll be pleased with the wonderful changes that await you!

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Taylor

The New Wellness Center at MediLodge of Taylor

The Role of Nutrition in Sarcopenia Prevention

MediLodge of Yale understands the important connection between nutrition and health. Approximately 45% of older adults in the United States are affected by Sarcopenia, a number that will continue to increase as the population ages. Sarcopenia, the Greek term meaning “poverty of the flesh,” is the progressive loss of muscle mass, function, quality, and strength driven by the aging process. This loss of muscle mass often leads to diminished strength and decreased activity levels and can contribute to mobility issues, osteoporosis, falls, and fractures, frailty and loss of physical function and independence.

MediLodge of Yale

Factors that accelerate an older adult’s loss of muscle mass include: decreased physical activity, refusal to consume meals related to restrictive therapeutic diets, decreased ability to eat independently, adverse consequences of medications, and depression. The older adult on average consumes fewer calories and protein than younger adults. Studies illustrate the correlation between protein ingestion and muscle mass. So it is very important to consume proteins in an effort to support good health and to stimulate protein synthesis within the body thus promoting muscle mass. Beneficial proteins are listed below. Try to incorporate and encourage older adults to enjoy these foods and promote good health this holiday season and throughout the year.

Examples of Beneficial Proteins include:

• Pudding

• Cheese / Cottage Cheese / String Cheese

• Peanut Butter / Nuts

• YogurtMediLodge of Yale

• Hearty Soups

• Milk / Dairy Products

• Hard Boiled Eggs

• Hummus

• Granola / Seeds / Nuts

• Tuna / Beef / Pork / Poultry

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Yale

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