Posts Tagged ‘diet’

Finding Your Balance

MediLodge of Rochester Hills TherapyFrom the MediLodge of Rochester Hills Therapy Department

Have you ever felt dizzy, lightheaded, or as if the room is spinning around you? These can be very troublesome sensations. If the feeling happens often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems are among the most common reasons that older adults seek help from a doctor. Having good balance means being able to control and maintain your body’s position, whether you are moving are remaining still. An intact sense of balance helps you walk without staggering, get up from a chair without falling, climb stairs without tripping, bend over without falling, to name just a few important examples. Good balance is important to help you get around, stay independent, and carry out daily activities.

People are more likely to have problems with balance as they get older. But age is not the only reason these problems occur; there are other causes, too. In some cases, you can help reduce your risk for certain balance problems.

Some balance disorders are caused by problems in the inner ear. The part of the inner ear that is responsible for balance is the labyrinth. When the labyrinth becomes infected or swollen, this condition is called labyrinthitis. It is typically accompanied by vertigo and imbalance. (Vertigo is the feeling that you or the things around you are spinning.) Upper respiratory infections and other viral infections (and less commonly, bacterial infections), can lead to labyrinthitis.

Diseases of the circulatory system, such as stroke, can cause dizziness and other balance problems. Smoking and diabetes can increase the risk of stroke. Low blood pressure can also cause dizziness.

MediLodge Physical TherapyBalance problems can also result from taking certain medications. For example, some medications, such as those that help lower blood pressure, can make a person feel dizzy. Ototoxic drugs are medicines that damage the inner ear. Sometimes the damage lasts only as long as you take the drug; other times it is permanent. Some antibiotics are ototoxic. If your medicine is ototoxic, you may feel off balance. Check with your doctor if you notice a problem while taking a medication.

Your diet and lifestyle can help you manage certain balance-related problems. For example, Meniere’s disease, which causes vertigo and other balance and hearing problems, is linked to a change in the volume of fluid in the inner ear. By eating low-sodium or salt-free foods, you can make Meniere’s disease symptoms less severe. Balance problems due to high blood pressure can be managed by eating less salt, maintaining a healthy weight, and exercising.

The ear infection called otitis media is common in children, but adults can get it too. You can help prevent otitis media by washing your hands frequently. Also, talk to your doctor about getting a yearly flu shot to stave off flu-related ear infections. If you still get an ear infection, see a doctor immediately before it becomes more serious.

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MediLodge of Rochester Hills

MediLodge of Rochester Hills

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Heart Healthy Practices

By Chris Burchell, Executive Chef at MediLodge of Monroe

So who’s tired of shoveling snow?? And the winter has just begun … at least as far as the calendar is concerned. I, however, am not convinced. As far as I am concerned, we are neck deep in winter. And while shoveling snow can be some good exercise, I for one am nearly over it. We are now about to be smack dab into February, a month notably attributed to Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s Day, a day associated with hearts, seems to be very appropriate for February, given the fact that February is also National Heart Healthy Month! Ah our heart … this great engine of our cardiovascular system unfortunately goes unnoticed until something terrible happens. This is why recognizing heart healthy practices are so important. Along with a bit of exercise, the easiest way to take care of our heart is by being diligent in choosing the right things to eat.

Heart-healthy is not only about oatmeal and omega-3 fats, whole grains, beans and legumes, nuts, and teas are just as important, in that they offer all sorts of complex heart-protective phytonutrients. Fresh produce provides the cornerstone for a heart-healthy diet because they help wipe out free radicals in the bloodstream, protecting blood vessels. Salmon tops the list of heart healthy foods, but many foods are really quite good and are not exotic at all. Almonds & walnuts, kidney beans, red wine, brown rice, carrots, broccoli, spinach, and blueberries are all very effective at nutritionally providing things the heart loves.

The main idea would be to eat “whole-foods”… foods that are not processed at all, or at least minimally processed. Eating these kinds of food every day will greatly help you to have a healthier heart. And with a greater number of different items, you allow yourself to not become bored, which is the death blow to any “healthy” change in lifestyle.

Maple Glazed Salmon Salad

Ingredients
Walnut Oil Vinaigrette:
• 1/2 cup walnut oil
• 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
• 2 tbsp Dijon mustard
• 1 garlic clove, mincedSalmon
• ½ tsp salt
• ¼ tsp pepper
Salad:
• 1 tbsp olive oil
• 2 tbsp real maple syrup
• 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
• 1 lb salmon filet
• Salt and pepper
• 6 cups baby spinach
• 1 cup Blueberries
• 1 cup walnuts, lightly toasted
Instructions:
1. For Walnut Oil Vinaigrette, whisk all ingredients together and set aside.
2. For the salad, preheat oven to 4250F and brush a baking dish with olive oil.
3. In a small bowl, whisk together Dijon mustard, maple syrup and maple extract.
4. Cut filet into 4 even portions and arrange in baking dish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and brush with glaze.
5. Bake 9 to 11 minutes, until fish is cooked through and flakes easily with a fork. Remove and let cool 10 minutes.
6. Divide baby spinach between 4 large plates.
7. Sprinkle each with chopped blueberries and walnuts.
8. Top each with a salmon portion.
9. Enjoy with a glass of red wine…my favorite – Valpolicella, a fruity but not sweet red.

Recipe provided by alldayidreamaboutfood.com

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

National Wear Red Day Raises Awareness of Heart Disease in Women

Go RedFebruary is all about the HEART! MediLodge of Richmond reminds you that it isn’t just all about the Valentine flowers, cards and candy. This is a perfect time to keep those New Year’s Resolutions going strong – to be a healthier and stronger you in this New Year! Heart disease has been called the Silent Killer because it often has no noticeable symptoms. It’s more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. And it’s not just “an old man’s disease.”AHA

In 2003, research revealed that heart disease was by far the No. 1 killer of women, and actually killed more women than men. To save lives and raise awareness of this serious issue, the American Heart Association launched Go Red For Women. And the red dress has become the iconic symbol of our battle against heart disease in women.

National Wear Red Day® — the first Friday each February — is our special day to bring attention to this silent killer of women. We encourage everyone to wear red, raise their voices, know their cardiovascular risk and take action to live longer, healthier lives.

A decade of success since the first National Wear Red Day in 2003, we’ve made tremendous strides in the fight against heart disease in women. Through research and education to healthy lifestyle changes, we’re proud that:Heart Health
1. 34% fewer women now die from heart disease, saving 330 lives every day.
2. More women are taking ownership of their health by developing healthy lifestyles:
37% are losing weight
43% are checking their cholesterol
more than 50% exercise more
60% have improved their diets
33% have developed heart health plans with their doctor.
3. Awareness is up. 23% more Americans now realize heart disease is the #1 killer of women.
4. Awareness among minorities is up, doubling among Hispanic women and tripling among African American women.
5. 15% have quit smoking, and high cholesterol has declined by 18%
6. More communities have joined the fight. Registration in Go Red For Women is now more than 1.75 million. More than 25 million Red Dress Pins have been worn to support the cause. More than 185 cities host GRFW events and luncheons. And more than 2,000 landmarks light up in red on National Wear Red Day.
7. Legislative efforts are making a difference. Women no longer pay higher premiums than men for health coverage. And 20 states have programs for low-income women to get screenings for heart disease and strokes through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s WISEWOMAN.
8. More gender-specific guidelines have been developed, because women’s symptoms and responses to medication differ from men’s.
9. Gender-specific medical research is up. The FDA now requires clinical trial results be reported by gender.
10. Gender-specific inequalities have been identified; ensuring women receive the same level of heart treatment as men.
Visit www.goredforwomen.org for more information on this very important movement.
According to www.sheknows.com the 5 best ways to improve your heart health could be something that you already enjoy and love! Taking a brisk walk, swimming, going for a bike ride or do a little circuit training. Take time to take care of YOU and your Heart!

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Richmond

MediLodge of Richmond

January is National Oatmeal Month

The Most Powerful Breakfast for Weight Loss from MediLodge of St Clair

Did you know that simply eating breakfast raises your metabolism by 10 percent? Oatmeal is one of the most powerful breakfast foods of them all. If you are looking to get your body in great shape, you should incorporate this as a staple food in your diet.oatmeal

Oatmeal is the perfect meal to start your day because it boosts your energy and has plenty of fiber to keep you full and satisfied. Oatmeal breaks down slowly in the stomach, giving you long-lasting energy. It is also full of water-soluble fibers, which play a crucial role in making you feel full over a longer period of time. Studies have also shown that oatmeal reduces cholesterol, maintains blood sugar levels and fights against heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity.

If you want to add some powerful antioxidants to your oatmeal, simply throw on some blueberries and raspberries. These delicious fruits are packed with antioxidants that fight against heart disease, cancer, and a multitude of other ailments. Blueberries have also been proven to preserve vision. This powerful fruit rated highest in antioxidants among over 40 fruits and vegetables. What more could you ask out of the first meal of your day?

However, oatmeal doesn’t just have to be for breakfast. You can use it a couple hours before you exercise to energize your workout. You can even include oatmeal in your smoothies. It is also a wonderful addition to muffins and even as a covering for chicken breasts. Keep in mind that you must buy the unsweetened, unflavored variety. To spice it up a little, you can use bananas, berries, or milk. The downfall of pre-flavored oatmeal is that it often comes loaded with sugar calories. So, stick to the good stuff.

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of St Clair

MediLodge of St Clair

November is National Good Nutrition Month

By Chris Burchell, Executive Chef, MediLodge of Monroe

Everyone put away their summer clothes and get out the cold weather gear! It is sad to see temperatures sinking into the 40’s, but there is nothing like the changing of the seasons! One of nature’s greatest accomplishments is the changing of the seasons, and it only last for a brief period, starting right about now. November will find the leaves in their full glory. November also happens to be National Good Nutrition month. A wise theme for what is inevitably the start of the holidays, and so shrewdly placed just after Halloween!

I believe everyone can boost the nutrition of their daily diet without having to make serious significant changes. It is safe to say, however, that getting rid of as many prepared food items from your pantry and refrigerators is paramount to having any real kind of accomplishment in the area of nutrition.

MediLodge of Monroe

Simple changes like subbing celery and peanut butter or roasted nuts for chips, can make an immediate impact. Eating multiple small meals, 5 or 6, per day takes a little bit of planning and commitment, but can boost metabolism and have you finding yourself shedding unnecessary ounces of weight without even exercising.

One of the best ways to boost nutrition that I’ve seen the federal government attempt to implement was the idea of incorporating as many different colors on your meal plate as possible. It is simple and brilliant all at the same time…. most of the nutritious components in our food is grouped into certain foods. These groups of foods/nutritional components coincidentally enough fall linearly into certain color groups. Red fruits and vegetables are colored by natural plant pigments called “lycopene.” Lycopene, in tomatoes, watermelon and pink grapefruit, may help reduce risk of several types of cancer, especially prostate cancer. Orange/yellow fruits and vegetables are usually colored by natural plant pigments called “carotenoids.” Beta-carotene in sweet potatoes, pumpkins and carrots is converted to vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy mucous membranes and healthy eyes. Green foods get their hue from chlorophyll, a natural blood purifier that increases red blood cell count and helps the liver and kidneys eliminate toxins. The “indoles” in broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables may help protect against some types of cancer. Leafy greens such as spinach and broccoli are excellent sources of folate, a B vitamin that helps reduce risk of birth defects.

MediLodge of Monroe invites you to enjoy this delicious recipe!

Pasta Primavera

Ingredients:

3 carrots, peeled and cut into thin strips

1 bunch asparagus, woody stem removed, cut into 1 inch peices

2 yellow squash, cut into thin strips

1 onion, thinly sliced

1 yellow bell pepper, cut into thin strips

1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips

1 lb. mushrooms, sliced

1/4 cup olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1-1/2 tablespoons dried Italian herbs

1 pound short pasta (Penne, Farfalle, Etc.)

1 container grape tomatoes, halved

1/2 cup grated Parmesan or Asiago

pasta

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

  1. On a large heavy baking sheet, toss all of the vegetables with the oil, salt, pepper, and dried herbs to coat. Transfer half of the vegetable mixture to another heavy large baking sheet and arrange evenly over the baking sheets. Bake until the carrots are tender and the vegetables begin to brown, stirring after the first 10 minutes and adding tomatoes, about 20 minutes total.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente, tender but still firm to the bite, about 8 minutes. Drain.

Toss the pasta with the vegetable mixtures in a large bowl to combine. Season the pasta with salt and pepper, to taste. Sprinkle with the cheese and serve immediately.

Bon Appetit!

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

Pleasing Pumpkin Pancake Recipe from MediLodge of Richmond

Autumn is upon us and brings seasonal treats with it.  The shorter days and cooler nights signal a change in the weather and a change in our diet.  Cold apple cider and warm donuts at a local cider mill is a very popular weekend excursion for many here in Michigan.  Lodgers and staff at MediLodge of Richmond enjoy pumpkin pancakes with fresh maple syrup this time of year.

Pumpkin is a low calorie vegetable rich in dietary fiber, anti-oxidants, minerals, vitamins.  The fruit pulp is an excellent source of Vitamin A, calcium, potassium, phosphorus and fiber.  It is also a good source of Vitamins B and C.  The seeds are also very healthy.  They are an excellent source of dietary fiber and mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are good for heart health. In addition, the seeds are concentrated sources of protein, minerals and health-benefiting vitamins like iron and zinc. Further, they are an excellent source of the health promoting amino acid tryptophan, an important building block in the nervous system.

Pumpkin is very sweet and works particularly well in baking.  MediLodge of Richmond has shared a wonderful recipe for those cold autumn mornings when you need a nice warm breakfast to start you on your day.

Pumpkin Pancakespancake mix

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 ½ cups milk
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin, mashed
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 4 ounces melted butter
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 4 egg whites, stiffly beaten
  1. In a large bowl, sift together flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, coriander, cinnamon and nutmeg.
  2. In a separate bowl, combine milk, pumpkin, egg yolks, butter and vanilla extract.
  3. Pour combined liquid ingredients into dry ingredients and stir until just blended.
  4. Carefully fold in egg whites.
  5. Cook pancakes on a lightly oiled griddle.

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pancakes

30 Ways to Sneak More Fruits & Vegetables Into Your Diet

We all know that fruits and vegetables are an important part of our diet, but sometimes it can be difficult to come up with ways to work them in to our daily meals.  MediLodge of Yale‘s dietary team have come up with some clever and unique ways to work them in to our diet.  If you have any great ideas, we’d love to hear from you in the comments!

fruit veg heart

Breakfast

1. Add blueberries to pancakes, waffles, or muffin batter

2. Mix raisins, diced apple, or dried apricots into oatmeal

3. Add peppers, onions, spinach, broccoli, or shredded carrots to a morning omelet

4. Make a smoothie with fruit, low-fat yogurt, and ice

5. Add peppers and onions to hash browns, and serve with a little ketchup on the side

6. Top a toasted waffle with warmed applesauce

 

Lunch & Dinner

7. Top a pizza with mushrooms, peppers, onions, or pineapple

8. Put a slice of avocado on a regular sandwich

9. Add mushrooms, peppers, onions, or diced carrots to spaghetti sauce

10. Place a few slices of tomato on a grilled cheese sandwich

11. Add some extra mixed vegetables to soup

12. Add celery, onions, carrots, or peppers to meat loaf

13. Place sliced bananas on a peanut butter sandwich instead of jam

14. Add apples, grapes, or raisins to chicken salad

15. Spread some cranberry sauce on a turkey sandwich

16. Top pork chops with apples, pears, or raisins

17. Roast fish under a layer of lemon, orange, or lime slices

18. Add layers of frozen spinach or eggplant to lasagna

 

Sides and Snacks

19. Top a baked potato with salsa

20. Replace half of the oil in a recipe with applesauce when baking

21. Slice a sweet potato, toss with a little olive oil, season as you wish, and bake to make sweet potato chips

22. Add mandarin oranges or diced pears when making Jell-O® salad

23. Mix dried fruit with almonds, and add few M&M’s®

24. Stir fresh fruit and granola into yogurt

25. Use broccoli or diced pepper in macaroni and cheese

26. Blend cooked cauliflower into mashed potatoes

 

Dessert

27. Choose fruit sorbet instead of ice cream

28. Enjoy a baked apple stuffed with raisins and topped with a drizzle of caramel sauce

29. Dip strawberries in chocolate syrup and top with low-fat whipped cream

30. Roast pears with honey and a sprinkling of ginger.

 

From the desk of Charlene Wheaton (CDM) and Chef Bob

MediLodge of Yale

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For more information on locations and services, visit the MediLodge website.  Find us on Facebook for up-to-date pictures or watch our YouTube channel for videos of events and activities.

Vibrant Produce

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