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Finding Your Balance

MediLodge of Rochester Hills TherapyFrom the MediLodge of Rochester Hills Therapy Department

Have you ever felt dizzy, lightheaded, or as if the room is spinning around you? These can be very troublesome sensations. If the feeling happens often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems are among the most common reasons that older adults seek help from a doctor. Having good balance means being able to control and maintain your body’s position, whether you are moving are remaining still. An intact sense of balance helps you walk without staggering, get up from a chair without falling, climb stairs without tripping, bend over without falling, to name just a few important examples. Good balance is important to help you get around, stay independent, and carry out daily activities.

People are more likely to have problems with balance as they get older. But age is not the only reason these problems occur; there are other causes, too. In some cases, you can help reduce your risk for certain balance problems.

Some balance disorders are caused by problems in the inner ear. The part of the inner ear that is responsible for balance is the labyrinth. When the labyrinth becomes infected or swollen, this condition is called labyrinthitis. It is typically accompanied by vertigo and imbalance. (Vertigo is the feeling that you or the things around you are spinning.) Upper respiratory infections and other viral infections (and less commonly, bacterial infections), can lead to labyrinthitis.

Diseases of the circulatory system, such as stroke, can cause dizziness and other balance problems. Smoking and diabetes can increase the risk of stroke. Low blood pressure can also cause dizziness.

MediLodge Physical TherapyBalance problems can also result from taking certain medications. For example, some medications, such as those that help lower blood pressure, can make a person feel dizzy. Ototoxic drugs are medicines that damage the inner ear. Sometimes the damage lasts only as long as you take the drug; other times it is permanent. Some antibiotics are ototoxic. If your medicine is ototoxic, you may feel off balance. Check with your doctor if you notice a problem while taking a medication.

Your diet and lifestyle can help you manage certain balance-related problems. For example, Meniere’s disease, which causes vertigo and other balance and hearing problems, is linked to a change in the volume of fluid in the inner ear. By eating low-sodium or salt-free foods, you can make Meniere’s disease symptoms less severe. Balance problems due to high blood pressure can be managed by eating less salt, maintaining a healthy weight, and exercising.

The ear infection called otitis media is common in children, but adults can get it too. You can help prevent otitis media by washing your hands frequently. Also, talk to your doctor about getting a yearly flu shot to stave off flu-related ear infections. If you still get an ear infection, see a doctor immediately before it becomes more serious.

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MediLodge of Rochester Hills

MediLodge of Rochester Hills

National Wear Red Day Raises Awareness of Heart Disease in Women

Go RedFebruary is all about the HEART! MediLodge of Richmond reminds you that it isn’t just all about the Valentine flowers, cards and candy. This is a perfect time to keep those New Year’s Resolutions going strong – to be a healthier and stronger you in this New Year! Heart disease has been called the Silent Killer because it often has no noticeable symptoms. It’s more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. And it’s not just “an old man’s disease.”AHA

In 2003, research revealed that heart disease was by far the No. 1 killer of women, and actually killed more women than men. To save lives and raise awareness of this serious issue, the American Heart Association launched Go Red For Women. And the red dress has become the iconic symbol of our battle against heart disease in women.

National Wear Red Day® — the first Friday each February — is our special day to bring attention to this silent killer of women. We encourage everyone to wear red, raise their voices, know their cardiovascular risk and take action to live longer, healthier lives.

A decade of success since the first National Wear Red Day in 2003, we’ve made tremendous strides in the fight against heart disease in women. Through research and education to healthy lifestyle changes, we’re proud that:Heart Health
1. 34% fewer women now die from heart disease, saving 330 lives every day.
2. More women are taking ownership of their health by developing healthy lifestyles:
37% are losing weight
43% are checking their cholesterol
more than 50% exercise more
60% have improved their diets
33% have developed heart health plans with their doctor.
3. Awareness is up. 23% more Americans now realize heart disease is the #1 killer of women.
4. Awareness among minorities is up, doubling among Hispanic women and tripling among African American women.
5. 15% have quit smoking, and high cholesterol has declined by 18%
6. More communities have joined the fight. Registration in Go Red For Women is now more than 1.75 million. More than 25 million Red Dress Pins have been worn to support the cause. More than 185 cities host GRFW events and luncheons. And more than 2,000 landmarks light up in red on National Wear Red Day.
7. Legislative efforts are making a difference. Women no longer pay higher premiums than men for health coverage. And 20 states have programs for low-income women to get screenings for heart disease and strokes through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s WISEWOMAN.
8. More gender-specific guidelines have been developed, because women’s symptoms and responses to medication differ from men’s.
9. Gender-specific medical research is up. The FDA now requires clinical trial results be reported by gender.
10. Gender-specific inequalities have been identified; ensuring women receive the same level of heart treatment as men.
Visit www.goredforwomen.org for more information on this very important movement.
According to www.sheknows.com the 5 best ways to improve your heart health could be something that you already enjoy and love! Taking a brisk walk, swimming, going for a bike ride or do a little circuit training. Take time to take care of YOU and your Heart!

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For more information on The MediLodge Group, visit our website, find us on Facebook or tune in to our YouTube Channel.

MediLodge of Richmond

MediLodge of Richmond

MediLodge Celebrates National Healthy Vision Month

Keeping An Eye On Vision Health In Women

Doctors say maintaining vision health can be especially important for women. In fact, a new report from the National Women’s Health Resource Center, “Women and Healthy Vision,” shows that women are at higher risk than men for having vision problems, including blindness, as they age.  Fortunately there are ways to keep your eyes healthy.

Quit smoking. Blog Eye

If you smoke, you’re much more likely to develop age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, than nonsmokers.  AMD is the most common cause of blindness in those over 65.  While there are some ways to slow its progression, there is no cure.

Wear sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat when you’re in the sun.

These two simple steps can reduce your exposure to eye-damaging UV rays up to 18-fold.  If you wear contacts, ask your eye care specialist about contact lenses with UV protection.

Watch your weight.

Being overweight is a major risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes.  Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in those under 65.  In addition, the Nurses’ Health Study from Harvard Medical School found medically obese women were 36 percent more likely to develop cataracts.

Take fish oil supplements daily, or eat fish two or three times a week.

There’s some evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and other foods may reduce your risk of AMD. Conversely, limit the amount of vegetable oil in your diet.

Eat three or more servings of fruit a day.fruits and veg

In one study, women who did so reduced their AMD risk by 36 percent compared to those who ate less than 1.5 servings.

Eat your spinach.

What Popeye didn’t know was that spinach is a rich source of lutein and zea-xanthin, powerful antioxidants that can reduce the risk of certain eye diseases, like AMD.  Other good sources include any kind of leafy green vegetable such as collards and kale, as well as eggs and orange-colored fruits.

See your eye care professional for a full vision examination at least once every two years.

Go more often if you have diabetes or any other eye-related condition.

Get a walk in every day.

In one study, glaucoma patients who walked briskly four times per week for 40 minutes lowered the pressure within their eyes enough so they could stop taking their glaucoma medication.seniors walking

Change your eye makeup every three to six months.

It becomes contaminated with bacteria and can infect your eye.

Don’t fall asleep in your daily wear contact lenses.

In fact, don’t ever wear them longer than they’re designed to be worn.

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