Posts Tagged ‘weight’

Tips To Help Incorporate Exercise Into Your Life

exerciseMediLodge of Sterling is happy to share this helpful article on working exercise into your daily routine.

About 80 percent of Americans don’t make exercise a regular habit, and, according to a recent American Heart Association website survey, 14 percent say they don’t like exercise. So how do you overcome an exercise aversion? Mercedes Carnethon, Ph.D., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, has some tips to help you incorporate exercise into your life – and maybe even learn to like it.
1. Find an exercise that best fits your personality, Dr. Carnethon said. If you are social person, do something that engages you socially – take a group exercise class, join a kickball team or walk with a group of friends. Or, if you prefer having time alone, walking or jogging solo might be a better fit for you. MyWalkingClub.org is the perfect way to connect with others who share your goals, lifestyles, schedules and hobbies. Try some of these ideas to help you get moving – at home, at work or at play.
2. Make it a Habit. It takes about three weeks for something to become a habit, so give yourself the time to create a regular routine. One way is to try to exercise around the same time each day. “Exercise can become addictive in a positive way,” said Dr. Carnethon, who is also an American Heart Association volunteer. “Once it becomes a habit, you’ll notice when you aren’t doing something.”

3. Build Exercise Into Your Lifestyle. Be honest with yourself. If you don’t live close to a gym, it’s not going to become a habit for you. Likewise, if you are not a morning person, don’t plan on somehow getting up at the crack of dawn to make a boot camp class. “The key is building activity into your lifestyle so it is not disruptive,” Dr. Carnethon said. There are many ways to fit exercise into your life, and it doesn’t mean you have to make a big financial investment. You can borrow exercise videos from the library or DVR an exercise program. Do weight or resistance training with items around your home (for example, use canned goods as light weights). Walking is great option, as well. The only investment is a good pair of shoes.

4. Do Bouts of Exercise. It’s OK to break up your physical activity into smaller segments, Dr. Carnethon said. The American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes a day of exercise most days, but if that sounds overwhelming, try three 10-minute workout sessions. You could do a quick calisthenics routine when you wake up, take a brief walk after lunch at work and, if you commute with public transportation, get off a stop earlier and walk the rest of the way.

5. Keep Going. If you miss a day or a workout, don’t worry about it. Everybody struggles once in a while. Just make sure you get back at it the next day. “It doesn’t take too long to get back on track,” Dr. Carnethon said. “It’s easy to make something a habit again. You will see same benefits before. Any little bit you can fit in will show benefits.”

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November is National Good Nutrition Month

By Chris Burchell, Executive Chef, MediLodge of Monroe

Everyone put away their summer clothes and get out the cold weather gear! It is sad to see temperatures sinking into the 40’s, but there is nothing like the changing of the seasons! One of nature’s greatest accomplishments is the changing of the seasons, and it only last for a brief period, starting right about now. November will find the leaves in their full glory. November also happens to be National Good Nutrition month. A wise theme for what is inevitably the start of the holidays, and so shrewdly placed just after Halloween!

I believe everyone can boost the nutrition of their daily diet without having to make serious significant changes. It is safe to say, however, that getting rid of as many prepared food items from your pantry and refrigerators is paramount to having any real kind of accomplishment in the area of nutrition.

MediLodge of Monroe

Simple changes like subbing celery and peanut butter or roasted nuts for chips, can make an immediate impact. Eating multiple small meals, 5 or 6, per day takes a little bit of planning and commitment, but can boost metabolism and have you finding yourself shedding unnecessary ounces of weight without even exercising.

One of the best ways to boost nutrition that I’ve seen the federal government attempt to implement was the idea of incorporating as many different colors on your meal plate as possible. It is simple and brilliant all at the same time…. most of the nutritious components in our food is grouped into certain foods. These groups of foods/nutritional components coincidentally enough fall linearly into certain color groups. Red fruits and vegetables are colored by natural plant pigments called “lycopene.” Lycopene, in tomatoes, watermelon and pink grapefruit, may help reduce risk of several types of cancer, especially prostate cancer. Orange/yellow fruits and vegetables are usually colored by natural plant pigments called “carotenoids.” Beta-carotene in sweet potatoes, pumpkins and carrots is converted to vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy mucous membranes and healthy eyes. Green foods get their hue from chlorophyll, a natural blood purifier that increases red blood cell count and helps the liver and kidneys eliminate toxins. The “indoles” in broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables may help protect against some types of cancer. Leafy greens such as spinach and broccoli are excellent sources of folate, a B vitamin that helps reduce risk of birth defects.

MediLodge of Monroe invites you to enjoy this delicious recipe!

Pasta Primavera

Ingredients:

3 carrots, peeled and cut into thin strips

1 bunch asparagus, woody stem removed, cut into 1 inch peices

2 yellow squash, cut into thin strips

1 onion, thinly sliced

1 yellow bell pepper, cut into thin strips

1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips

1 lb. mushrooms, sliced

1/4 cup olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1-1/2 tablespoons dried Italian herbs

1 pound short pasta (Penne, Farfalle, Etc.)

1 container grape tomatoes, halved

1/2 cup grated Parmesan or Asiago

pasta

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

  1. On a large heavy baking sheet, toss all of the vegetables with the oil, salt, pepper, and dried herbs to coat. Transfer half of the vegetable mixture to another heavy large baking sheet and arrange evenly over the baking sheets. Bake until the carrots are tender and the vegetables begin to brown, stirring after the first 10 minutes and adding tomatoes, about 20 minutes total.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente, tender but still firm to the bite, about 8 minutes. Drain.

Toss the pasta with the vegetable mixtures in a large bowl to combine. Season the pasta with salt and pepper, to taste. Sprinkle with the cheese and serve immediately.

Bon Appetit!

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MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge of Monroe

MediLodge Celebrates National Healthy Vision Month

Keeping An Eye On Vision Health In Women

Doctors say maintaining vision health can be especially important for women. In fact, a new report from the National Women’s Health Resource Center, “Women and Healthy Vision,” shows that women are at higher risk than men for having vision problems, including blindness, as they age.  Fortunately there are ways to keep your eyes healthy.

Quit smoking. Blog Eye

If you smoke, you’re much more likely to develop age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, than nonsmokers.  AMD is the most common cause of blindness in those over 65.  While there are some ways to slow its progression, there is no cure.

Wear sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat when you’re in the sun.

These two simple steps can reduce your exposure to eye-damaging UV rays up to 18-fold.  If you wear contacts, ask your eye care specialist about contact lenses with UV protection.

Watch your weight.

Being overweight is a major risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes.  Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in those under 65.  In addition, the Nurses’ Health Study from Harvard Medical School found medically obese women were 36 percent more likely to develop cataracts.

Take fish oil supplements daily, or eat fish two or three times a week.

There’s some evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and other foods may reduce your risk of AMD. Conversely, limit the amount of vegetable oil in your diet.

Eat three or more servings of fruit a day.fruits and veg

In one study, women who did so reduced their AMD risk by 36 percent compared to those who ate less than 1.5 servings.

Eat your spinach.

What Popeye didn’t know was that spinach is a rich source of lutein and zea-xanthin, powerful antioxidants that can reduce the risk of certain eye diseases, like AMD.  Other good sources include any kind of leafy green vegetable such as collards and kale, as well as eggs and orange-colored fruits.

See your eye care professional for a full vision examination at least once every two years.

Go more often if you have diabetes or any other eye-related condition.

Get a walk in every day.

In one study, glaucoma patients who walked briskly four times per week for 40 minutes lowered the pressure within their eyes enough so they could stop taking their glaucoma medication.seniors walking

Change your eye makeup every three to six months.

It becomes contaminated with bacteria and can infect your eye.

Don’t fall asleep in your daily wear contact lenses.

In fact, don’t ever wear them longer than they’re designed to be worn.

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